Tinned lychee & raspberry sorbet

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This wonderfully refreshing lychee and raspberry sorbet is great as a dessert or as a cheeky little palate cleanser.

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Note: this recipe works well with any tinned fruit – pears, mandarins, cherries……in which case, use 2 tins to serve 8 – or half the recipe below.

While I much prefer using fresh fruit, which gives the most majestic flavour to the sorbet, I have made this sorbet using a tin of lychees and a tin of raspberries – in which case I use the juices in the tins in place of the water in the recipe.

Tinned fruit actually works very well here. This is particularly useful if getting fresh fruit has been a challenge with the impact of Corona Virus on shopping, for example – a sorbet really is a great use for them and gives a taste of luxury at a difficult time.

I sometimes add a little rose water for an Ispahan flavour – but not too much rose water as it can over-power easily and resemble granny’s underwear draw!

I add liquid glucose as it prevents the sorbet from freezing to a solid block when it is stored in the freezer and gives a nicer texture, but it isn’t essential.

If you don’t have an ice cream maker, put the cold mixture into a freezable container, ideally large and shallow, and pop in the freezer. Every hour or so, give it a thorough mix a spoon to incorporate the frozen bits with the bits that have not yet frozen.

Recipe: lychee & raspberry sorbet – serves 8

  • 250g fresh or tinned lychees – (1 standard tin), but peeled and stoned if fresh
  • 250g raspberries – tinned (1 standard tin), fresh or frozen
  • 250ml water (or use the liquid if using tinned fruit)
  • 80g caster or granulated sugar
  • 60g liquid glucose*
  • 1 tablespoon Framboise liqueur or vodka, optional

*the liquid glucose is not essential but if you do have some it gives a better, smoother texture. If not, increase the sugar to 120g.

(1) Put the raspberries into a food processor and blitz all you get a smooth pulp. Strain through a sieve to get rid of the raspberry seeds and pour the raspbeery purée back into the food processer along with the lychees. Blitz to give a very smooth mixture.

NB: whizzing the lychees with the raspberry purée helps the lychees break down to a smooth pulp.

(2) Put the water, sugar, liquid glucose into a pan and bring to the boil. Simmer for about 8-10 minutes or until slightly reduced and a light syrup.

(3) Leave to cool fully and stir in the raspberry and lychee purée, and the alcohol (if using). Churn in an ice cream maker until fairly firm (about 45 minutes), before transferring to a freezable container and popping into the freezer.

NB: for serving, remove the container from the freezer and put in the fridge for about 30 minutes or so to soften up a little to enable it to be scopped easily. I like to sprinkle over a little lime zest on top when serving.

 

Author: Philip

Finalist on Britain’s Best Home Cook (BBC Television 2018). Published recipe writer with a love of growing fruit & veg, cooking & eating.

3 thoughts on “Tinned lychee & raspberry sorbet”

  1. we are lucky living in queensland that you can get fresh lychees in summer but i often use tinned in recipes as they are easy to have in the pantry. i love these flavours together. hope you’re keeping well. cheers sherry

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